Music and Mental Illness: The Deep Connection Between Music and Our Emotions

A couple nights ago I was in a panic, unraveling my house to find one of my most treasured items-my headphones. After hours of searching through every junk drawer, cabinet, pocketbook and kitchen appliance I came to the conclusion that they were gone. I know this is a really traumatic story! The lost headphones were not of great quality, so it didn’t hurt to purchase a good pair that fit into my bloggers budget. However, I was bewildered by how much it made me feel uneasy knowing that I didn’t have them or any headphones in the house. When I went to purchase a new pair online, I decided to fall into the trending Bluetooth headphones. Ten minutes after they arrived, I set them up, put them on, and they haven’t left my head since. It made me reflect on the deep connection between music and our emotions.

The Deep Connection Between Music and Our Emotions

The way music connects to our emotions is almost magical. Even if you do not live with a mental illness you can still understand this connection. After we face some sort of obstacle in our life, such as heartbreak, music suddenly becomes louder, more clear and you connect with your emotions on a deeper level. It is liberating. You gain hope that everything will be okay, you get excited by the visuals running through your head, and go to a place where you are free from whatever is happening on the outside.

Since I was a child, music has played an essential role in my life. Every moment I could break away to be alone and listen to music, I would take it. Especially when I was dealing with heavy emotions, prior to my diagnosis of bipolar disorder, listening to music allowed me to escape into my own world. My imagination, emotions, and ideas all crashed into one another causing me to spend hours in my room alone dancing around. In high school, when my mental health really started to decline, music became something that got me through the day. Listening to it on the boombox in my room, on a speaker or on the car radio did not give me the comfort that headphones did. It was a way for me to enclose myself and be entirely consumed in my own thoughts. It was like shutting the door on the noise that surrounded me day after day, and entering a new form of noise that gave me comfort in my emotions.

Every day after school, I would go home, grab my headphones and go outside with a basketball dribbling it around until the sun went down or I was forced to come inside. As an athlete, I knew I could get away with being on my own because it looked like I was practicing. It got to the point where my hands were covered in blisters. In middle school, I started physical therapy due to the significant strains on my feet from literally being on them non stop. Everyone in my family has caught me in a moment when I am literally in a trance with my headphones on. It has turned into a comical story shared from time to time in my family.

Creativity is the basis of my work, and it’s the root of my passion. I am creating various types of content from morning till night. Music has played a tremendous role in my work and is a source of inspiration in the way it makes me feel and how it allows me to deeply connect to my emotions, whether good or bad.

Music has healing power. It has the ability to take people out of themselves for a few hours. -Elton John

Music is a safe place for those of us living with a mental illness to explore the sort of emotional wonderland that exists within our minds. It has helped me understand the beauty and power of my emotions that in society is seen as flawed. The most exciting thing is the more I have become involved in the mental health community, the more I realize how similar those of us living with a mental illness are to one another. The more I talk about music and mental illness the more people reach out to me exclaiming that they feel the exact same way. Music plays such a significant role in my life coping and managing bipolar disorder, and I think many people living with a mental illness feel the exact same way. It reveals the power of music.

A lot of people who follow my Instagram (@hannahdblum)  recently saw my Instastory and asked me where I got my Bluetooth headphones. Here is the Amazon link to the ones I have which are really great thus far:  Mpow 059 Bluetooth Headphones

 

 

 

2 Replies to “Music and Mental Illness: The Deep Connection Between Music and Our Emotions”

  1. I find this facinating! Our son is bipolar and spends most of his free time just writing music.

    Like

    1. Hi Connoley! Majority of us have a fascination with music. That is great he spends his free time writing music. I am sure he is fantastic. Thank you for sharing! -Hannah

      Like

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