Gone with the Wind, Lost in Her Mind: Vivien Leigh and Her Life with Bipolar

5 thoughts on “Gone with the Wind, Lost in Her Mind: Vivien Leigh and Her Life with Bipolar”

  1. Wow as I read further I found Marilyn Monroe’s story! Ironically not coincidentally I have been watching videos about her struggles this week with mental illness! Wow! God works in mysterious ways! Her story is very inspiring! Thanks for posting! 

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    1. Hi! Thank you so much. Marilyn’s is one of my favorites as well. You should watch “Bus Stop” with her. Vivien’s story is incredible, so happy you found it useful! Thanks! -Hannah

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  2. Good information but several errors in the writing – misspellings, typos, punctuation, grammar, etc. Takes away from the story. Get an editor or at least a proofreader – a bright high school student who gets A’s in English would probably do.

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      1. Well, here are some you missed:

        In 1936, actor Laurence Olivier and Leigh met one another.
        *delete “one another” – they met. That’s all you need to say. And add a comma

        Vivien would get along fine for a few weeks, a few months-be perfectly normal and friendly and involved in her activities. * that’s the wrong punctuation. You need a dash not a hyphen and you need spaces:
        Vivien would get along fine for a few weeks, a few months — be perfectly normal and friendly and involved in her activities.

        Around the age of 25, the symptoms of bipolar disorder began to surface heavily in Leigh.
        *When Leigh was around 25, the symptoms of bipolar disorder began to surface. “ heavily” is not the right word to use here

        Leigh could pull from her emotions so that other actresses auditioning for the same role as her would drop out.
        *same role as she [was] would drop out. NOT “the same role as her”!

        While rehearsing for the film Caesar and Cleopatra, Leigh, who was pregnant at the time, miscarried, triggering her into a deep depression that emphasized her struggle with bipolar disorder.
        *to avoid the awkwardness of using all the commas, the sentence should be rewritten

        She was a woman who, at her weakest, represented strength, a true icon. * it’s not truly a sentence unless you add “she was”

        I will be happy to continue to proofread your articles before you hit Send to publish them for all to see. I know you want them to be perfect.
        “Not only did her friend” paragraph is in there twice

        Tennessee Williams is his name. The possessive is formed thus: Williams’

        Olivier would eventually have an affair with Joan Plowright, an actress who was 22 years younger than him.
        *younger than he [was]

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